Hurricane Info

Hurricane Activity: Increase Expected

On May 19, 2011, forecasters predicted another active season for 2011 with between 12 and 18 named storms, 6 to 10 hurricanes and 3 to 6 major hurricanes.

Last year the United States was fortunate.  Winds steered most of the season’s tropical storms and all hurricanes away from our coastlines.  We can’t count on luck to get us through this season. We need to be prepared, especially with this above-normal outlook.


2010 Season: Less than Forecast

The quieter-than-forecast 2010 season should not be taken as a sign that the long range view has changed significantly. Most hurricane forecasters have issued 2011 forecasts calling for an active season, in line with long range trends.

The 2010 hurricane season, for the most part, was not as active as the experts had predicted. 

Do You Feel Lucky?

Forecast accuracy aside, the fact is we face a real threat from hurricanes. If you choose to wait to protect your home, you're taking a gamble you might not win. Lucky is good, but prepared is better.


What to do?

Given this information, what can you as a homeowner do? Well, home safety experts (see Institute for Business & Home Safety story) will tell you that protecting your home's openings from high winds and flying debris is the single most important step you can take to guard against a hurricane's destructive forces. If you are serious about protecting your property, we recommend that you take their very sound advice. If you are a Do-it-Yourself homeowner and want a simple, inexpensive way to do that, take a look at our hurricane fabric screens. Once you do, you'll see that Storm Catcher, a product of Storm Smart Industries is the best solution to your hurricane protection problem.

Take Steps NOW to Protect Your Home

When you purchase a Storm Catcher Do-it-Yourself Direct Mount Hurricane Screen system to protect your home, you will have peace of mind when the inevitable does happen and a hurricane approaches. Ready to order? Go to our measurement tutorial to see how to get started. Questions about price? If you know the dimensions of the openings you want to protect, you can go right now to our Quick Estimate screen and get a no-obligation look at just how little it costs to give your family and home the protection they deserve.


For Your Information 

Here's a listing of future Hurricane Names for the Atlantic Basin, as well as some pictures of recent large hurricanes. We've also included a brief description of hurricane categories, using the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale.

Atlantic Hurricane Names

  2011  2012  2013   
Arlene
Bret
Cindy
Don
Emily
Franklin
Gert
Harvey
Irene
Jose
Katia
Lee
Maria
Nate
Ophelia
Philippe
Rine
Sean
Tammy
Vince
Whitney
Alberto
Beryl
Chris
Debby
Ernesto
Florence
Gordon
Helene
Isaac
Joyce
Kirk
Leslie
Michael
Nadine
Oscar
Patty
Rafael
Sandy
Tony
Valerie
William
Andrea
Barry
Chantal
Dorian
Erin
Fernand
Gabrielle
Humberto
Ingrid
Jerry
Karen
Lorenzo
Melissa
Nestor
Olga
Pablo
Rebekah
Sebastien
Tanya
Van
Wendy

Interested in how hurricanes are named? Download this pdf from NOAA:

Naming Hurricanes

Hurricane Images

Isabel 2003

Isabel 2003

Frances 2004

Katrina 2005

Andrew 1992


Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale

Category 1 (74-95 MPH): Damage is done primarily to shrubbery and trees, unanchored mobile homes are damaged, some signs are damaged, no real damaged is done to structures.
Category 2 (96-110 MPH): Some trees are toppled, some roof coverings are damaged, major damage is done to mobile homes.
Category 3 (111-130 MPH): Large trees are toppled, some structural damage is done to roofs, mobile homes are destroyed, structural damage is done to small homes and utility buildings.
Category 4 (131-155 MPH): Extensive damage is done to roofs, windows, and doors; roof systems on small buildings completely fail; some curtain walls fail.
Category 5 (155+ MPH): Roof damage is considerable and widespread, window and door damage is severe, there are extensive glass failures, some complete buildings fail.